African Small Carnivore Research Initiatives 

  • ASCaRIs Head Office, University of Fort Hare, Zoology Building, King William's Town Road, Alice, Eastern Cape, 5700, South Africa
  • ascaris.org@gmail.com

Slender Mongoose

Kruger N. P. (South Africa)

© E. Do Linh San

Grandidier's Vontsiras fighting

Lac Tsimanampetsotsa N. P. (Madagascar)

© www.nickgarbutt.com

Banded Mongooses

Etosha N. P. (Namibia)

© N. Devos

Small-spotted Genet

Ngorongoro Conservation Area (Tanzania)

© J.-M. Weber

Black-backed Jackal

Mountain Zebra N. P. (South Africa)

© E. Do Linh San

Meerkat pups drinking

Kalahari Trails (South Africa)

© E. Do Linh San

Honey Badger

Kgalagadi T. P. (South Africa)

© E. Do Linh San

Fossas mating

Kirindy Forest (Madagascar)

© www.nickgarbutt.com

African Wildcat

Kgalagadi T. P.  (South Africa)

© E. Do Linh San

Yellow Mongooses

Kgalagadi T. P. (South Africa)

© E. Do Linh San

WHAT IS ASCARIS?

ASCaRIs is a non-profit scientific organization aiming at promoting research, disseminating new knowledge and ultimately funding research projects on African small carnivores – based on much needed donations.

WHY ASCARIS?

Contrarily to large carnivores such as Lion, Leopard, African Wild Dog or Spotted Hyaena, African small carnivores have received very little attention from the scientific community. Yet, they also play important roles in the ecosystem. They can control some prey populations (e.g. rodents and insects) – which are often considered as agricultural pests by humans – or transport and disseminate the seeds of several plants (a phenomenon called zoochory), among other functions. In addition, some small carnivore species are highly social and therefore constitute interesting models to study the processes underlying the evolution of sociality in mammals.

WHY DO WE NEED YOUR HELP?

With so much emphasis put on larger, more charismatic, and sometime more endangered carnivores, it is often difficult for researchers interested in studying the smaller species to obtain enough funding to really make a difference. Yet, almost everything still needs to be discovered about the biology, ecology and behaviour of a majority of the 80+ species of small carnivores living in Africa. Your precious donations will therefore assist us in developing and funding new projects in multiple regions of this fascinating continent. These funds will be used to acquire research material, cover basic running costs (e.g. fuel for field vehicles) and pay tuition fees of postgraduate students from disadvantaged backgrounds. 

LATEST PROJECTS

 We currently have a few research projects running. Click on the respective projects to learn more about them. Please do not hesitate to contact us if 1) you have ideas and/or funds for other projects, and would like to collaborate with us, or 2) you work on African small carnivores and would like to join ASCaRIs and showcase your important research work on this website.

 

<span style="font-weight: bold;">Telperion Nature Reserve  (South Africa)</span>
Telperion Nature Reserve  (South Africa)
MSc student Rouxlyn Roux (UNISA; on the right) and her field assistant Roxanne Collins (UNISA; on the left) conducted the first exhaustive study on the spatial ecology, activity patterns and resting ecology of this elusive nocturnal small carnivore. Rouxlyn is currently busy working on the second draft of her MSc dissertation. She just presented the results of her project in the framework of a symposium titled "Advances in research and conservation of small African carnivores" as part of the 12th International Mammalogical Congress (July 9-14, Perth, Australia).
Spatio-temporal ecology of Rusty-spotted Genet 
<span style="font-weight: bold;">Telperion Nature Reserve  (South Africa)</span>
Telperion Nature Reserve  (South Africa)
MSc student Julia Zemouche (University of the Witswatersrand) is currently carrying out a 1-year comparative study on the diet of these two understudied sympatric small carnivores. She is interested to know what they eat and whether their respective diets vary seasonally, reflect food availability and overlap or not.
Comparative diets of Rusty-spotted Genet and Slender Mongoose
<span style="font-weight: bold;">Great Fish River Reserve (South Africa)</span>
Great Fish River Reserve (South Africa)
Post-doctoral researcher Filipe Carvalho (University of Fort Hare) just started a 3-year study on the mechanisms underlying competition and co-existence in sympatric carnivores. He will investigate the possible spatial and temporal overlap or segregation between these two genet species, while some MSc students will complement the study by collecting information on diet and latrine use.
Spatio-temporal ecology of sympatric Cape and Small-spotted Genets
<span style="font-weight: bold;">Great Fish River Reserve (South Africa)</span>
Great Fish River Reserve (South Africa)
MSc student Masibulele Xhobani (University of Fort Hare) is currently using camera-trapping to study the use of latrines by these two genet species. He is interested to know how many individuals visit the latrines, at what time of the night, how frequently this takes place, what behaviours are performed, and finally whether some latrines are possibly used by both genet and other carnivore species.
Latrine use by sympatric Cape and Small-spotted Genets
<span style="font-weight: bold;">Great Fish River Reserve (South Africa)</span>
Great Fish River Reserve (South Africa)
MSc student Axola Plaatjie (University of Fort Hare) is currently carrying out a 1-year comparative study on the diet of these two sympatric genet species. He is interested to know what they eat and whether their respective diets vary seasonally and whether these two species potentially compete for food.
Comparative diets of sympatric Cape and Small-spotted Genets
<span style="font-weight: bold;">Central Karoo farmland and Anysberg Nature Reserve (South Africa)</span><br>
Central Karoo farmland and Anysberg Nature Reserve (South Africa)
PhD student Marine Drouilly (University of Cape Town) is using camera-traps, GPS collars, scat analysis and in-depth questionnaires with small-livestock holders to study the socio-ecological mechanisms behind farmer–mesopredator conflict in the Central Karoo. She is interested in Black-backed Jackal (Canis mesomelas) and Caracal (Caracal caracal) diet and spatial ecology on farmland where they are heavily persecuted, along with farmers’ attitudes towards mesopredators and their management practices.
Socio-ecological mechanisms behind farmer–mesopredator conflict
<span style="font-weight: bold;">Kibale National Park (Uganda)</span><br>
Kibale National Park (Uganda)
PhD student David Mills (University of KwaZulu-Natal) is currently using camera-trapping to study niche partitioning within a tropical forest small carnivore community. Leopards (Panthera pardus) have been extirpated from this forest, leaving the African Golden Cat (Caracal aurata) as the largest terrestrial, mammalian predator. In addition to Golden Cats, his main study species include the Serval (Leptailurus serval), African Palm Civet (Nandinia binotata), African Civet (Civettictis civetta), Servaline Genet (Genetta servalina), Rusty-spotted Genet (G. maculata), and Marsh Mongoose (Atilax paludinosus). He is investigating spatio-temporal niche preference, looking for evidence of spatio-temporal release due to the absence of apex predators, and assessing their respective adaptability to human-altered landscapes.
Niche partitioning of small rainforest carnivores
<span style="font-weight: bold;">Tswalu Kalahari Reserve (South Africa)</span><br>
Tswalu Kalahari Reserve (South Africa)
MSc student Roxanne Collins (University of South Africa) is attempting to determine the effects of apex predator (such as Lion Panthera leo) loss on community dynamics, with specific reference to mesopredators such as Caracal (Caracal caracal) and Black-backed Jackal (Canis mesomelas). Indeed, changes in predator community structure or losses of specific carnivores may alter community and intraguild relationships, resulting in changes in mesopredator communities and trophic cascading. With the use of camera-traps, Sherman traps, and an array of sampling techniques, she is determining the mesopredator, small mammal and wild bird densities and abundances across two areas (with and without Lion) at Tswalu Kalahari Reserve. The study predicts that the cascading effects due to changes in mesopredator guilds alter small mammal and bird community dynamics.
Response of mesopredators to different apex predator regimes
<span style="font-weight: bold;">The southern coastline and the greater Dullstroom area (South Africa)</span><br>
The southern coastline and the greater Dullstroom area (South Africa)
MSc student Rowan Jordaan (University of Pretoria) is currently using stable isotope techniques to compare diet and visual observations to investigate the diving behaviour of the African clawless (Aonyx capensis) and spotted-necked (Hydrictis maculicollis) otters occupying different habitats in South Africa. He is interested in behavioural plasticity and how these species vary their foraging ecology in relation to habitats that vary in climatic condition, prey availability and human disturbance.
The foraging ecology of South Africa’s two otter species
<span style="font-weight: bold;">Mpala Research Centre (Kenya)</span><br>
Mpala Research Centre (Kenya)
BSc student Lilian Gakuhi (Karatina University) is using capture-mark recapture data to estimate seasonal densities of Slender Mongooses (Galerella sanguinea) on Mpala Research Centre. She is interested to find out whether densities change across seasons or differ from those estimated from a previous study at the same site conducted nearly two decades ago.
Density of Slender Mongooses
<span style="font-weight: bold;">Mau Forest (Kenya)</span><br>
Mau Forest (Kenya)
MSc student Aaron Onserio (Maasai Mara University) is currently using camera-trapping, interviews, and dietary studies to examine the potential for conflict between small carnivores and humans living in the Mau Forest. He is interested to know if small carnivore diets from this region support local views on conflict related to small carnivores inhabiting the region.
Small carnivore–human conflict in the Mau Forest
<span style="font-weight: bold;">Laikipia Plateau (Kenya)</span><br>
Laikipia Plateau (Kenya)
MSc student Aaron Onserio (Maasai Mara University) is currently examining fecal samples collected from White-tailed Mongooses (Ichneumia albicauda) and Common Genets (Genetta genetta) in central Kenya to compare dietary niche space between the two species, among sexes, and across seasons.
Comparison of diets between White-tailed Mongooses and Common Genets
PROJECTS IN NEED OF FUNDING

 We showcase here projects which are in the planning phase and which will require your generous support in order to become a reality. 

 

<span style="font-weight: bold;">Tunisia</span>
Tunisia
Prospective PhD student Firas Hayder (to be registered at the University of Fort Hare, South Africa) has been planning a project on this poorly studied mustelid (related to martens and badgers). Funding is needed to purchase radio-tracking material (radio-collars, receiver, antennas, GPS unit), rent or buy a cheap but reliable second hand field car, and cover fuel and other running costs.
Ecology, behaviour and conservation of Libyan Striped Weasel in Tunisia
HAVE SOME FLAIR!

 Please donate to assist our research efforts and help us reaching our goals!

Sponsors donating $100 and above will be listed on this website*.

Sponsors donating more than $1,000 will be acknowledged in scientific papers and conference presentations* emanating from the corrresponding projects.

Private donors willing to fund the entirety of a research module (from $5,000) will be given the opportunity to visit the corresponding field project and assist the research team with data collection (e.g. live-trapping, radio-collaring,  radio-tracking, setting up camera-traps, etc.) during 1-2 week stays, as per arrangement and local conditions.

ASCaRIS adopts a full transparency policy and annual financial reports will be made available to sponsors and private donors on demand.

WE THANK YOU WHOLEHEARTEDLY FOR YOUR PRECIOUS AND GENEROUS ASSISTANCE!

*Kindly contact us per email if you want to remain anonymous.

JOIN OUR TEAM!

 Are you passionate about small carnivores too? Then do not hesitate to contact us in order to inquire how you can assist us. Join our team by carrying out a field or a lab project (students); by proposing, supervising and/or funding some new projects (project leaders); or by gathering information on small carnivores in specific countries (informants and country representatives). Kindly use the electronic form below to contact us. We are already looking forward to hearing from you!